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Blame Pharmacy Benefit Managers For Driving Drug Price Inflation

Lawrence W. Abrams No Comments

Summary:

We start with a review of the history of the opaque pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) reseller business model. We present our prior estimates of the distribution of PBM gross profits over the past decade showing that they have become dependent today on retained rebates from specialty drugs.

Next, we present numbers showing how PBMs today have painted themselves into a corner with a relatively small basis for drug rebates coupled with promises to hold their overall average rebate retention rate, a term we coined in 2003, to a “reasonable” 10%.

We conclude the paper with a deconstruction of the growing divergence between brand drug list prices (gross) and the prices Pharma actually receive after PBM rebates (net) — the so-called “gross-to-net price bubble”.  We use data supplied by the drug company Merck to go through a step-by-step sequence of how PBMs and drug companies might negotiate the parameters of a rebate deal today under the constraint that PBMs have to grow gross profit DOLLARS over time while fixing the rebate retention rate at 10%.  

We show that the outcome of such constrained negotiations produces a gross-to-net price bubble.

The “Gross-To-Net Price Bubble”

Before 2017, there had been two well-publicized exposes of massive increases in the list price of off-patented brand drugs that were rubber-stamped by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs).  This included Mylan’s EpiPen and Martin Shkreli and his Turning Pharmaceutical’s HIV drug Daraprim.

There are now numerous reports providing quantitative evidence of outrageous increases in specialty brand drugs list prices over the past 5 year.  For example, consider this table of list price inflation between 2012-7 of Multiple Sclerosis drugs taken from Congressman Michael Vounatsos’ request to manufacturers for more information:

In April 2017, Adam Fein first reported on his blog Drug Channels that the health information company QuintilesIMS had just published  aggregate trend data for brand name drug prices before (gross) and AFTER rebates (net) had been paid to pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs).

The data showed  two trends beginning in 2011: (1) gross prices were growing faster than net prices; (2) the divergence itself was growing.

Dr. Fein coined the term “gross-to-net rebate bubble” to describe (2) above, which has become the standard lexicon for the phenomena. Below is graph summarizing QuintilesIMS latest findings taken from an April 2017 blog post by Dr. Fein:

The PBM Business Model:  2005 – 2010

In an earlier 2017 paper, we presented the case that there has been three distinct phases of the pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) business model over the past 15 years. Each has been demarcated by radical shifts in their primary source of gross profits:

  1. up to 2005 — reliance on retained rebates from small molecule brand drugs;  
  2. 2005 – 2010 — reliance on mail order generic Rx margins;
  3. 2010 – today — reliance on retained rebates from specialty drugs.

Below is graph of our estimates of the distribution of PBM gross profits over the past 15 years.

The majority of PBMs gross profits between 2005 – 2010 came a mail order generic Rx.   The Big 3 PBMs devised a strategy of tacitly colluding with their counterpart Big 3 retail pharmacies — Walgreen, CVS, and Rite-Aid — to hold up margins on generic Rx fills.  

Essentially the Big 3 PBMs have the power to set their competitors’ prices, an anti-competitive weapon if there ever was one.   PBMs gave retailers fat margins for 30-day generics in return for promises not to compete on 90-day Rx.  Then, PBMs set the prices of generic Rx filled by captive mail order operations slightly less than retail to give the appearance of alignment with client interests.  But, the supply chain hold up still allowed for fat mail order generic Rx margins.

The first blow to this scheme came in late 2006 when Walmart saw the fat retail margins and began a disruptive  $4 / generic Rx campaign. They could do this as an “outsider” retailer because their business model wasn’t dependent on fat pharmacy margins subsidizing the rest of the store.

The final blow to this “hold-up” scheme came around 2008 several years after the vertical merger of the pharmacy retailer CVS and the PBM Caremark.   Consistent with the business model of the merged company, CVS-Caremark began offering preferred provider pharmacy networks featuring lower  unit prices at retail in return for Rx volume.  

While this managed care technique is used successfully in reducing hospital and physician costs, it has never really been instituted by PBMs prior to the CVS-Caremark merger.  This absence had been an obvious sign to us at the time of tacit collusion between the Big 3 retail pharmacies and the Big 3 PBMs.

The PBM Business Model: 2010 – today

To compensate for declining mail order generic margins after 2010, PBMs saw the rising trend of specialty and biotech drugs as a promising basis for a renewed reliance on retained rebates.

But there were several problems with the goal of deriving a majority of gross profits from specialty drug rebates.    Reconstructing how PBMs solved these problems is the key to understand why PBMs, not Pharma, drive the gross-to-net drug price bubble today.

First, assume that since 2010, the Big 3 PBMs needed additional gross profits each year from specialty drug retained rebates to replace incremental losses in margins from mail order generics Rx.

This creates a problem in that the specialty drug Rx volume “basis” for collecting rebates today is a lot less than it was ten years ago when small molecule drugs were the basis for rebates.  How much less?  The Pew Charitable Trust Foundation sponsored a study which found that in 2015 special Rx comprised only 1% of total Rx.  

A decade ago, we estimated that about 20% of total Rx filled were “rebatable” brand drugs, i.e. in therapeutic classes with a few other brand drugs that were therapeutic equivalents.  So instead of 1:100 specialty Rx to total Rx basis differential, we arrive at a 1:20 “rebatable” specialty drug Rx to “rebatable” small molecule brand drug Rx basis differential.

In other words,  ten years ago PBMs has 20 times the volume of Rx available to them to use as a basis for generating retained rebates as they do today.

The second constraint that PBMs have today is an the awareness by their clients that retained rebate dollars can be substantial yet opaque source of PBM gross profits.    

Today,  there seems to be an order of magnitude more articles critical of PBMs in general, and retained rebates specifically,  As a defensive move, CVS Health finally declared publicly on its website that,

“CVS Caremark was able to reduce trend for clients through… negotiation of rebates, of which more than 90 percent are passed back to clients.”

The problem facing PBMs today is how to derive a majority of gross profits from specialty Rx while maintaining a transparent rebate retention rate at 10% on average.

The business model of the drug companies is simple and stable by comparison.  Sure, drug companies want to maximize profits just like the PBMs.  But drug companies are not constrained as much as the Big 3 PBMs and don’t need a convoluted gross-to-net price scheme to achieve their targets.

It is important to remember that it takes two parties to negotiate drug rebate deals. Drug companies have some power in determining how these deals are structured, especially if there are only one or two other brands drugs that are therapeutic equivalents.

The Big 3 PBMs today have a lot of power in rebate negotiations.  Drug companies have a lot to lose if negotiations fall through.  Exclusion of a single drug from one of Big 3 PBMs’ national lists of drugs covered by an insurance plan  — called formularies — can cost a widely-used or expensive drug $3+ Billion dollars in lost revenue.

It is the Big 3 PBMs who drive schemes involving high-list-price / high-rebate specialty drug deals.  For now, drug companies are accomplices along for the ride. They are culpable, but much less so than PBMs.  

A Deconstruction of Merck’s Gross-to-Net Drug Price Bubble

We conclude the paper with a deconstruction of the growing divergence between brand drug list prices (gross) and the prices Pharma actually receive after PBM rebates (net) — the so-called “gross-to-net price bubble”.  We use data supplied by the drug company Merck to go through a step-by-step sequence of how PBMs and drug companies might negotiate the parameters of a rebate deal today under the constraint that PBMs have to grow gross profit DOLLARS over time while fixing the rebate retention rate at 10%.

We show that the outcome of such constrained negotiations reproduces produces a gross-to-net price bubble.

Below is a screenshot from a Merck memo laying out for all to see their “gross-to-net drug price bubble”.  Other drug companies are publishing similar data as a way of defending themselves against charges of “double-digit” price-gouging tactics.

This is a graphic depiction of Merck’s gross-to-net price bubble:

Below we build a spreadsheet which “deconstructs” Merck’s bubble for a hypothetical specialty drug.  It  shows how PBMs can grow retained rebates dollars via a combination of growing rebate percentages while maintaining a retention rate fixed at 10%.

A larger view of the spreadsheet above:

 

Note that despite being constrained to a 10% rebate retention rate, this deal scheme give PBMs yearly retained rebate DOLLARS that are 176% greater that what they received 6 years earlier.

Some have predicted that the divergence between gross and net prices will level off after 2017.

We tend to agree with that prediction as the current bubble was fueled by PBMs’ need to REPLACE a declining trend in gross profits from mail order generic Rx.  With that loss fully offset, PBMs could grow gross profits in the future by maintain a steady divergence between list prices and net prices.

Pharmacy Benefit Managers – Research Papers

Lawrence W. Abrams No Comments

All papers downloadable as .pdf  for free

CURRENT PAPERS ON PBMs

It is Pharmacy Benefit Managers that Drive the Gross-to-Net Drug Price Bubble (09/17)

AbbVie’s Mavyret Hep C Drug Pricing Is Disruptive to the PBM Business Model (09/17)

The FTC and Pharmacy Benefit Managers: A History of Failed Economic Analysis, forthcoming

Merck Data Discredits PBM-Sponsored Study of Brand Drug Price Inflation (09/17) 

Pharmacy Benefit Managers: The Sopranos of The Specialty Drug Market (09/17)

THE PHARMACY BENEFIT MANAGER BUSINESS MODEL

Pharmacy Benefit Manager Valuation and Profitability: Business Models Matter (07/09)

Medco As a Business Model Imperialist (07/08)

Quantifying Medco’s Business Model: An Update (11/08)

A Tale of Two PBMs: Express Scripts vs. Medco (11/05)

Searching for Windfall Profits from a Change in the AWP Markup Ratio (09/09)

Exclusionary Practices in the Mail Order Pharmacy Market (09/05)

Quantifying Medco’s Business Model (04/05)

Estimating the Rebate-Retention Rate of Pharmacy Benefit Managers (04/03)

Walgreen’s Transparency Issue (11/03)

 UNDERSTANDING DRUG REBATES THROUGH BARGAINING THEORY

Pharmacy Benefit Managers as Conflicted Countervailing Powers (01/07)

Who is Best at Negotiating Pharmaceutical Rebates? (12/05)

The Role of Pharmacy Benefit Managers in Formulary Design: Service Providers or Fiduciaries?
Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy Vol. 10 No. 4 July/August 2004 pp 359-60

PBMs as Bargaining Agents
Paper presented at the 80th Annual Western Economic Association Meeting, July 6, 2005, San Francisco

PBMs as Bargaining Agents
PowerPoint presented at the 80th Annual Western Economic Association, Meeting, July 6, 2005, San Francisco

The Effect of Corporate Structure on Formulary Design: The Case of Large Insurance Companies
Poster Presentation, ISPOR 10th Annual Meeting, Washington DC, May 2005

PREFERRED PROVIDER PHARMACY NETWORKS

The CVS-Caremark Merger and the Coming Preferred Provider War (12/06)

Medicare Part D and Preferred Provider Pharmacy (04/05)

The CVS-Caremark Merger: The Creation of an Elasticity of Demand for Retail Rx (11/06)

Contrary to What Wall Street and the FTC Say, The PBM Business Model is Misaligned (11/05)

Sins of Omission’: A Review of the FTC Study of PBM Conflict of Interest (10/05)

THE EXPRESS SCRIPTS – ANTHEM 2009 DEAL

Express Scripts – Anthem 2009 Deal as Double Trouble Front (08/09)

Express Scripts Misses on Guidance of Anthem’s NextRx PBM Business Article Written for Seeking Alpha, November 4, 2010

THE FUTURE OF CONSUMER-DIRECTED PHARMACY BENEFITS

The Future of Consumer-Directed Pharmacy Benefits (08/07)

Show Me the Display: A Review of an ESI Study of Consumer-Directed Pharmacy Benefits (07/07)

LEGAL ISSUES

Exclusionary Practices in the Mail Order Pharmacy Market (09/05)

Practical Issues With PBM Full Disclosure Laws
Originally Published in Update Magazine, Issue 4, 2004. Available with permission from FDLI

The Formulary Game (07/03)

About the author:

I have a B.A. in Economics from Amherst College. I have a Ph.D. in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis.

My writings are at the intersection of economics, accounting,  financial analysis, and high tech.

I have received no remuneration for these articles. I have no financial relation with any company written about in these articles.

Lawrence W. Abrams

 

©Lawrence W. Abrams, 2017
To Contact:
labrams9@gmail.com
831-254-7325

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Understanding Drug Rebates Through Bargaining Theory

Lawrence W. Abrams No Comments

All papers downloadable .pdf

 Pharmacy Benefit Managers as Conflicted Countervailing Powers (01/07)

Who is Best at Negotiating Pharmaceutical Rebates? (12/05)

The Role of Pharmacy Benefit Managers in Formulary Design: Service Providers or Fiduciaries?
Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy Vol. 10 No. 4 July/August 2004 pp 359-60

PBMs as Bargaining Agents
Paper presented at the 80th Annual Western Economic Association Meeting, July 6, 2005, San Francisco

PBMs as Bargaining Agents
PowerPoint presented at the 80th Annual Western Economic Association, Meeting, July 6, 2005, San Francisco

The Effect of Corporate Structure on Formulary Design: The Case of Large Insurance Companies
Poster Presentation, ISPOR 10th Annual Meeting, Washington DC, May 2005

 

The Pharmacy Benefit Manager Business Model

Lawrence W. Abrams No Comments

CURRENT PAPERS:

Three Phases of the Pharmacy Benefit Manager Business Model (09/17)

It is Pharmacy Benefit Managers that Drive the Gross-to-Net Drug Price Bubble (09/17)

Merck Data Discredits PBM-Sponsored Study of Brand Drug Price Inflation (09/17) 

Pharmacy Benefit Managers: The Sopranos of The Specialty Drug Market (09/17)

AbbVie’s Mavyret Hep C Drug Pricing is Disruptive to the PBM Business Model (09/17)

PAST PAPERS:

Pharmacy Benefit Manager Valuation and Profitability: Business Models Matter (07/09)

Medco As a Business Model Imperialist (07/08)

Quantifying Medco’s Business Model: An Update (11/08)

A Tale of Two PBMs: Express Scripts vs. Medco (11/05)

Searching for Windfall Profits from a Change in the AWP Markup Ratio (09/09)

Exclusionary Practices in the Mail Order Pharmacy Market (09/05)

Quantifying Medco’s Business Model (04/05)

Estimating the Rebate-Retention Rate of Pharmacy Benefit Managers (04/03)

Walgreen’s Transparency Issue (11/03)